Snow Queen- studio shoot using the Broncolor MobiLED, Rotolight Neo and the Westcott Eyelighter

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Snow Queen- studio shoot using the Broncolor MobiLED, Rotolight Neo and the Westcott Eyelighter

Last week I had the opportunity to visit the Home Studio of Swng Productions in Austin, Texas while I was in town for the Imaging USA conference for PPA being held in San Antonio just an hour south of Austin.

The shoot wasn't planned at all.  The awesome guys over at Swng Productions follow me online and invited me to the studio to shoot.  As such we quickly put together a shoot calling upon models that we could find in about 3 hours notice.

We found the lovely Ashlyn Simon to be my model.  When she arrived I did what I normally do with my models and had her show me the wardrobe options she had available to her.  She showed me a fur coat that she had with her and we decided to shoot with it and a pair of shiny pants.

I started posing her and once I told her to put her arms up above her head I saw what I wanted to create....a Snow Queen shoot.  When she raised her arms above her head it gave her the appearance of wearing a headdress that was really neat.

So we set up the two Broncolor MobiLED lights with the Rotolight Neo and Westcott Eyelighter to create some truly unique images.  Since it was a studio shoot I knew I'd have to add some Photoshop magic to it to create my overall look.  Normally I'm an outdoor shooter and love using the location as my backdrop, but having the studio meant I had to create it in post.

Below are the shots taken during the shoot.  I also included samples of the same shot:

*Straight out of the camera

*Developed in Lightroom

*Edited in Photoshop

*Enhanced and Finished in Photoshop

Below are the other shots taken during the shoot edited and finished in Photoshop:

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Groom Getting Ready and Groom Portraits at a REAL Indian Wedding Workshop

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Groom Getting Ready and Groom Portraits at a REAL Indian Wedding Workshop

Many times so much emphasis at a wedding is placed upon the Bride.  While the Bride is certainly an extremely important person, we of course can't forget the groom right?  This shoot comes from my REAL Indian Wedding Workshop in Cherryhill, New Jersey with Akshar and Arti Patel.  In case you haven't seen Part 1 which includes my images taken of the bride Arti, you can find a link to them by clicking below:

http://www.jasonlanier.com/blog/real-indian-wedding-workshop-bride-getting-ready-at-the-crowne-plaza-cherry-hill-new-jersey

We went into the Groom's room and took the following shots that are included in the video as shown above.  It's important to capture the groom in a dignified and flattering manner which you can do by blending a style of photojournalism with light yet deliberate posing methods.  In other words, direct the shoot but don't overly pose the shoot.  Below are images taken of the Getting Ready portion:

After the getting ready portion we prepared for the First Look.  While waiting for the bride to arrive for the shoot I took a few minutes and did some groom portraits with Akshar as well.  All of these images were taken with lighting from the Rotolight Neo.  Below are the portraits of the groom taken at the ceremony site:

 

**Links to Gear:

*Sony A7Rii-  

*Sony 85mm G Master-  

*Sony Zeiss 35mm-  

*Rotolight Neo-  

Don't forget to subscribe to my Youtube Channel and my blog to get updated whenever we release new content!

Thanks,

Jason

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Real Indian Wedding Workshop- Bride Getting Ready at the Crowne Plaza Cherry Hill, New Jersey

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Real Indian Wedding Workshop- Bride Getting Ready at the Crowne Plaza Cherry Hill, New Jersey

For those that don't know, I've been doing REAL wedding workshops for years as a means to help photographers out there gain experience at great venues with wonderful clients.  In July of 2016 I had the opportunity to do a real indian wedding and hold a workshop at the wedding.

 

Why would clients agree to let me hold a workshop (where I bring photographers to shoot the wedding)?  The way the real wedding workshops work is that I give a discount to a wedding client in exchange for them allowing me to bring photographers along to shoot the wedding.

The photographers are allowed to use the images for their portfolio which is a huge boon for them to be able to bolster their portfolio at a great wedding that most of them would otherwise not be in a position to shoot.

The photographers have to obey rules set forth that makes sure the wedding goes off without a hitch including the way they act, the clothes they wear, even going as far as where they can stand during the wedding.  So far it's been a win-win as both the wedding clients and workshop attendees have benefited from the experience.

So I had a beautiful wedding couple to shoot, Akshar and Arti.  We first went to the bride's room where we did a shoot of Arti in her beautiful gown.  She is just one of the most stunning bride's I've ever been able to shoot.  The shots below were taken with the Sony A7Rii using the 16-35, 85mm G Master and the 35mm Sony Zeiss lens using the Rotolight Neo.

 

**Links to Gear:

*Sony A7Rii-  

*Sony 85mm G Master-  

*Sony Zeiss 35mm-  

*Sony 16-35mm Zeiss lens-  

*Rotolight Neo-  

Thanks and don't forget to subscribe to my blog!!

Jason

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How I Pose and Shoot Men- a Groom Shoot in the Maui Rainforest in Hawaii

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How I Pose and Shoot Men- a Groom Shoot in the Maui Rainforest in Hawaii

On my Youtube Channel I'm known for taking pics of lots of pretty women around the world. What some may not realize is before my Youtube and commercial work days I shot hundreds of weddings in many places which meant that I had to of course, shoot men.

Now this isn't a bad thing.  Shooting men is quite a bit of fun and is actually a completely different dynamic than when I shoot women.  I remember when I shot weddings I would go into the bridal room and more often than not the feel and vibe of the shoot was a romantic, fairy tale type of a shoot.  Everything seemed to be very poetic and magical.

**Don't forget to subscribe to my blog and Youtube Channel...:)

Then I would head over to the Groom's Room.  That was a different story.  Typically the groom's room involved a bit of alcohol consumption by the groom and his friends which lead to some pretty fun and crazy shoots.  In other words, I had to learn to shoot differently based upon shooting a bride vs. shooting a groom.

Many times (unless you're a male model), men don't particularly love having their picture taken. It's always one of those types of scenarios where men just "want to get the shoot over with." I learned over the years that using humor was a great way to get the groom to relax and actually get into the shoot.  Once I got their buy in, the shoot turned into something magical.  

Now I'm using generalities here and there are always exceptions.  Women and brides can certainly be wild and very funny and men can certainly be romantic and elegant.  But in the hundreds of weddings I've shot I've found my descriptions of both to be what I encounter the majority of the time.  Best piece of advice, learn who your clients are and adjust to their personality and needs.

So that leads us to this shoot.  This was a bride and groom out in Hawaii for their honeymoon. They found out I was in Hawaii on vacation and made arrangements with me to do a shoot of them in their wedding attire while out there.  This was very unique timing as it was their first day of their honeymoon, and my last day of vacation with my family.  So they were eager to get their honeymoon started and I was eager to get packed up and head to the airport.

I first spoke with the bride Karolina and when we spoke about doing the shoot she was very excited.  Her husband Ray was happy to do the shoot, but just didn't want it to go very long.  He was more than cooperative but like many grooms just "wanted to get it over with." Understanding this dynamic I persuaded the couple that there was this amazing rainforest that could produce some really gorgeous images.

So we drove down there to shoot.  I started setting up my gear and my friend Chris Millen agreed to come along to help roll video.  Thanks Chris!  I didn't have any assistants or crew since I was just there on vacation.  So I set up my gear and started shooting.  But the important thing was that I started shooting the groom (Ray) first.  I wanted and needed him engaged in the shoot.  I wanted him to feel good about taking the time to do the shoot and to feel good about himself.

We started joking around while shooting and before we knew it we were having a really fun banter back and forth which lead to some really great sets of images.  If you can get a groom to laugh and get him to feel good about himself, you can create some fantastic images.  Ray's wife is a model.  So you can imagine that might make anyone feel a little intimidated.  He probably assumed that a photographer would only be interested in shooting her.

By starting with him, by showing him that I really wanted to create something amazing with him, it really builds confidence which lead to a fantastic shoot.  At one point he teased his wife Karolina telling her that she was jealous I was spending so much time with him lol.

The bottom line is that if you take the time to show a man that their time is valuable and that you are invested in shooting them, the rewards can be great.  I highly recommend you watch the video to see the posing and techniques used to create the images below.  

Images taken with the Sony A7Rii and the 35mm Sony Zeiss f/1.4

Images taken using the Sony A7Rii with the 85mm G Master f/1.4

**Links to Gear Used:

*Sony A7Rii-  

*Sony Zeiss 35mm-  

*Sony 85mm G Master-  

*Flashpoint Xplor 600-  

*Westcott Rapid Box XL-  

*Feisol Monopod-  

I hope this helps and that it gives you some insight on how I shoot male subjects in general.  In essence if you do it right, it's an absolute blast that can give you some stellar results...

Thanks!

Jason

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Using the Sigma MC-11 Adapter with Sigma and Canon Lenses

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Using the Sigma MC-11 Adapter with Sigma and Canon Lenses

I get lots of questions about the adapted lenses that I use.  Should I use the Sigma MC-11 Adapter or the Metabones Adapter?  Well recently I had the opportunity to shoot with the MC-11 Adapter during my commercial shoot for Mia Bella Couture.  

First I used the 20mm f/1.4 Art lens that I was really excited to try.  It's the fastest aperture wide angle lens on the market that also does Auto Focus.  It's a canon mount lens made by Sigma and I have to say...it is truly a nice lens.  Very sharp and when paired with the MC-11 Adapter it behaves as close to a native Sony FE lens that you will find.  Below are some of the shots taken with the 20mm Art lens on my Sony A7Rii.  All shots were taken at f/1.4:

I then wanted to get some shots a little bit tighter so I put the 85mm Canon L lens on it and shot it wide open at f/1.2.  The adapter performed at the same level as the Metabones adapter which was really nice to see.  Below are shots taken with the 85mm:

The sun was close to being all the way set so I quickly put on the 200mm Canon L lens which also performed very well.  These were all taken at f/2.8:

All in all it was a great shoot and the MC11 performed very well.  Please take a moment to check out the video to see how the shoot went.  Flash was the Flashpoint Xplor600 with the Westcott Rapid Box XL as the modifier.  For links to the gear that was used please see below:

*Sony A7Rii-  

*Sigma MC11 Adapter-  

*Sigma 20mm f/1.4 lens-  

*Canon 85mm f/1.2 lens-  

*Canon 200mm f/2.8 lens-  

*Flashpoint Xplor600 monolight-  

*Westcott Rapid Box XL-  

Thank you for taking the time to visit my blog.  I truly hope the information is useful.  Please click on subscribe so you're notified everytime we have a new blog post...:)

Thanks!

Jason

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Commercial Couture Gown Photography Shoot in La Jolla California

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Commercial Couture Gown Photography Shoot in La Jolla California

This was really a fun and fast paced shoot.  We shot earlier on in the day down at Balboa Park as part of my commercial photography shoot for Mia Bella Couture.  By the time we got down to La Jolla we didn't have a lot of time before sunset so that meant doing a lot of quick shoots of a lot of different gowns with different models.

 

This is one of the main reasons why I always tell the photographers that I train that it's essential to know how to quickly diagnose lighting scenarios and apply the correct technique to get great results.

The first shoot was a fun one where we took my 8x8 Westcott Scrim Jim with the reflector and held it above the rocks of the model Tiffany to cut bounce light from the sun.  We used a Westcott Illuminator Reflector on bottom to fill, and then I fired the Flashpoint Xplor 600 to give catch light to the eyes.  The resulting images are seen below:

I then brought the next model Lauren into the same spot but changed the lighting set up to give the client a different look and background.  We switched the reflective surface on the Scrim Jim for the diffuser to cut light still using the flash and smaller reflector.  Those images can be seen below:

We then went out onto the beach where I shot Tiffany in a stunning red gown.  These shots were created using the Scrim Jim as a reflector and then just used the Flashpoint Xplor as my key light.  These images are below:

I then used the same lighting set up to create these shots with Lauren.  It really is fun to be ale to shoot so many different gowns and all of them are just AMAZING.  Mia Bella Couture really has some beautiful gowns and Daryl Rene Artistry did a fantastic job on hair and make up.  Below are the shots of Lauren in the blue gown:

I then switched back to Tiffany for a shoot that we fashioned as more of a mermaid type look with the dress that she wore that matched the tones of the rocks of the beach.  We even used the cover for the reflector for her to sit on to be able to keep the dress clean.  These shots are seen below:

Being pressed for time as we neared sunset, Tiffany quickly switched gowns and we shot her in a very cute and fun dress that had lemons on it.  Such a fun shoot!

I can't thank everyone enough for helping to make this shoot happen, including my Assistant Brenda, videographer Jason, and my volunteer assistants Lynette and Hans,  And of course a tremendous thank you to Mia Bella Couture!

**Links to Gear:

*Sony A7Rii-  

*Metabones Mark 4 Adapter-  

*Canon 85mm f/1.2 lens-  

*Canon 200mm f/2.8 lens-  

*Westcott Scrim Jim-  

*Westcott Rapid Box XL-  

*Flashpoint Xplor 600-  

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Wedding Bridals in Balboa Park

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Wedding Bridals in Balboa Park

So in my career I've shot 250+ weddings all over the world.  In recent years my wedding workload has diminished quite a bit due to picking up commercial work along with my teaching and speaking schedule.  But when I got the opportunity to do a commercial shoot with Mia Bella Couture shooting wedding gowns, it took me right back to my roots as a wedding photographer.

We went down to Balboa Park in San Diego which is an absolutely beautiful location.  Using a reflector and the Flashpoint Xplor 600 I started shooting with my Sony A7Rii and the Canon 200mm f/2.8.

My mail goal with this shoot was to create a very light, bright, romantic type of a shoot.  The model was Daryl Rene and she did a truly fantastic job in helping me create these shots.  The mood of the shoot was created by the combination of using the off camera flash with a beauty dish on it (the Westcott Rapid Box XL) and the reflector on the other side.  It should be noted that this shoot took place at around 1pm on a day where the lighting was very harsh, so controlling the light by overpowering the sun was crucial.

Below are some of the shots created by using this lighting set up under a row or lattice work and columns in Balboa Park;

We then tried something new and I fired the Flashpoint through the Scrim Jim just to see what effect it would give.  The thought was in essence to create a giant outdoor softbox.  I thought the shots came out pretty cool and created some very soft light.  You can see these shots below:

It was a really great shoot and I hope you take a moment to watch the video as well so you can see how these were created.  A big thanks to Mia Bella Couture for hiring me to do the commercial shoot.  If you'd like to get in contact with us for wedding or commercial photography please contact me at jason@jlpros.com.

**Links to Gear:

*Sony A7Rii-  

*Metabones Mark 4 Adapter-  

*Canon 200mm f/2.8 lens-  

*Westcott Scrim Jim-  

*Westcott Rapid Box XL-  

*Flashpoint Xplor 600-  

Thanks!

Jason

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First shoot using the Canon 200mm f/2.8 lens with the Sony A7Rii- Commercial Fashion Photography

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First shoot using the Canon 200mm f/2.8 lens with the Sony A7Rii- Commercial Fashion Photography

So as many of you know I like trying out and using adapted glass on my Sony bodies.  It's really cool and revolutionary that I can use glass that's made and mounted for another camera system on my Sony bodies with Auto Focus and Exif Data.  I don't shoot with adapted glass because I have to....I shoot with adapted glass because I can.

So when I had my commercial shoot come up for Mia Bella Couture it was a great way for me to really show the power of this new lens that I think is a great steal.

I bought the Canon 200mm f/2.8 used for about $600.  It's an L lens and is much lighter and easier to maneuver than it's 70-200 bigger brother.  Of course the 70-200 is great for zoom capabilities but if you're like me, and you are okay with being stuck at 200mm and want to save on money and weight, this is a gem of a lens.

**Links to Gear:

*Sony A7Rii-  

*Metabones Mark 4 Adapter-  

*Canon 200mm f/2.8 lens-  

*Westcott Scrim Jim-  

*Westcott Rapid Box XL-  

*Flashpoint Xplor 600-  

You still get the compression and aperture benefits of a 200mm f/2.8 lens which is awesome.  So I invite you to click PLAY on that video to see how this shoot went down.  We battled harsh light with diffusers, bounced back light with reflectors, and added some fill and catch light with high speed off camera flash.  A pretty crazy shoot I must say...:)

It was truly fun as I was able to work with some fantastic models, my crew, and a few photography students as well. Below are the images taken at the shoot.

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Laowa 105mm f/2 STF Smooth Trans Focus Lens

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Laowa 105mm f/2 STF Smooth Trans Focus Lens

So, I kinda collect lenses.....it's kind of an obsession of mine that I probably might need to seek professional help on at some point in time.  I went through and got just about every Sony lens that interested me, then got about the same with Canon lenses and I already owned some Nikon glass from my Nikon shooting days.  So that brought me to looking for some more unique type of lenses out there.

My followers would sometimes ask me about the Sony 135mm Smooth Trans Focus lens.  I already own and love the Sony Zeiss 135mm f/1.8 lens (not the same lens), so when I got the itch to try out a STF lens my attention got directed towards a new product out there from Laowa.  The Laowa lens is an actual made for Canon, Nikon and for Sony FE mounts.  

I actually found the lens used online so I purchased a Canon mount version knowing I could use my Sigma or Metabones adapter with the lens.  The lens is manual focus on any mount and as such adapting a Canon lens for manual focus was more than easy for me to do... But it is nice to see other manufacturers making glass for the native Sony mirrorless mount system as I'm sure more and more will continue to do.

So what is an STF lens?  In layman's terms the lens contains an apodization element in the optical formulas that well, makes things more out of focus.  It changes the way the out of focus balls (bokeh) are rendered especially as it relates to their shadowing.  In even more simple terms, it's a way to get more blur and a different rendition of the bokeh than you would normally see in a lens at that focal length.

The Laowa is a 105mm lens with an f stop of 2, but a t stop of 3.2.  There are two separate controls for both the aperture and the t stop on the lens itself.  When you move the aperture ring it does what a normal lens does and changes exposure.  But when you crank on that t stop ring, it starts to do something magical.  It really starts to render that background blur in an incredibly smooth way that for some people (like me) we find to be very pleasing to the eye.

I'm a bit of a wide aperture whore...I just love it.  So when I found out a lens existed that would enable me to blur out the background even more than a conventional lens at that focal length it got me pretty interested.  So I took my team to the Muir Woods in San Francisco with the lens in hand mounted on my Sony A7Rii.  My assistant and model Brenda posed for me while the rain and cold invaded our souls (it was pretty miserable lol).  

I tested the lens in both video and in stills.  Please make sure to check out the video to see for yourself.  I gotta say that using a lens like this is really beneficial if you have focus peaking like I have on my Sony bodies.  I'm in no way afraid of manual focus, but after being spoiled by the Sony Focus Peaking system which illuminates the in focus areas on your screen or viewfinder, it makes it much easier to operate a lens like this one.

In the video you'll see I tested it on various T stops including t/5.6, t/4, and t/3.2 which obviously had a direct impact on ISO and background rendering.  

The lens provided some very pleasing results in stills and I really loved what it rendered when I put it on the fence in the woods and showed it focusing down the entire fence to the background of the trees.  Focus was sharp and I included a super crop in the video and stills below for you to see for yourself.  These images were only illuminated using a reflector while it was raining and edited using Lightroom only.  I like to show you guys what the lens can do for others out there to get similar results.

The only major negative or con of this lens is the focus ring seems to take forever to turn.  I'm used to being able to get my focus either near or far away with one twist of my hand whereas with this lens it would require two.  Again, if you check out the video you'll see what I mean.  The lens seems well made and will stick in my kit bag for a long time to come.  If you're looking for a lens that will render some pretty out of this world results and aren't opposed to shooting in manual focus, I think you'll really enjoy it.

For Links to Gear please see below:


**Links to Gear:

*Sony A7Rii-  

*Sigma MC-11 Adapter-  

*Venus Laowa 105mm lens-  

*Lastolite Tri Flip Reflector-  

Thanks for coming by.  Don't forget to subscribe to my blog as well!!

Thanks,

Jason

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First Shoot with RAW files on the Sony A6500 with wild ocean seals in La Jolla, California

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First Shoot with RAW files on the Sony A6500 with wild ocean seals in La Jolla, California

I was very fortunate to be provided a loaner Sony A6500 from Sony for two days in late November.  The news came quick that I'd be able to use it so I called my Assistant Brenda asking her to organize a shoot as quickly as she could.

She organized a group of models and crew to meet down in La Jolla, California which is an absolutely beautiful area.  To be specific we went down to the area called the La Jolla Cove where not only is the coast line beautiful like many areas in Southern California, but you'll also be able to interact with some amazing wildlife.

So we went to set up the shoot on the rocks where the ocean meets the land and while setting up we were visited by an amazing seal.  The amazing creature came right out of the ocean, crawled up onto the rocks and started posing for me.  Now he didn't know he was posing....but he sure did a great job of letting me take his picture.

At the moment when he came up we weren't even fully set up and ready to shoot.  I'd just pulled the A6500 out of the box and had put in a card.  My mic was also not even tucked in but luckily it was on.  I told my videographer Jason Coccio to start rolling the minute I saw him.  So while my plans were to shoot a model for my first set with the A6500, it ended up being a beautiful seal.

Since I was planning on doing a model fashion shoot I had the Sony 85mm G Master on the camera, not a traditional wildlife lens.  But I decided to go with it and shoot the seal in a similar manner to how I'd shoot a model portrait session.  I could have easily stopped down and shot it at f/2,8 or even more narrow, but I accepted the challenge to shoot it wide open at f/1.4.

Navigating around slippery rocks wasn't the easiest thing to do with a loaner camera and a $2,000 portrait lens, but it did result in some pretty awesome shots.  The first thing I noticed was just how FAST the camera focuses.  People say it's the same sensor as the A6300, but all I know is it tracks and finds focus faster....which is saying a lot because the A6300 is already fast. The seal gave me the very unique opportunity to really test the tracking because a seals head moves up and down and side to side like a rocking boat.  It is NOT easy to track.  Luckily the A6500 did a great job of finding and keeping focus.

Below are some shots taken with the A6500 and the 85mm G Master:

I then quickly placed the Sony 90mm macro lens on my camera and tried to get some detail shots of the seal.  Again, focus was achieved very quickly which enabled me to get some great shots.  

Below are shots taken with the Sony A6500 and the 90mm macro lens

So after shooting for about 15 minutes with the seal, it became sick of doing a photoshoot and meandered up the rocks to join the other seals that were there.  It was a great shoot and we quickly moved on from it to shooting with the models.

My initial thoughts from my first shoot with the A6500 was that it performed remarkably well. The buffer in Raw was significantly better than any other Sony camera I've ever used.  The auto focus was faster and it responded well in so many ways.  I even filmed some footage of the seal with the camera and noticed the benefit of having the IBIS on the camera. 

Below are some links to gear if you'd like to add one of these to your gear bag.

*Sony A6500-  

*85mm G Master Lens-  

*90mm macro lens- 

Thanks!

Jason

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Using Nikon lenses on Sony Mirrorless Bodies- the Fotodiox Fusion Adapter on my Sony A7Rii

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Using Nikon lenses on Sony Mirrorless Bodies- the Fotodiox Fusion Adapter on my Sony A7Rii

TAKE TWO!

For those that don't know, I had an unfortunate experience with my first Fotodiox Fusion Adapter. The first adapter rendered my Sony A6300 inoperable.  Shortly after that video was released Bohus from Fotodiox contacted me very concerned over the matter.  In a weeks time I was sent a replacement adapter and they gave me the money to replace my A6300.

No extra money or endorsements were given.

 

In an effort to be fair I told them that I would do a follow up shoot to see if the first adapter I received was just a lemon.  By the way the first adapter I paid full price for as well.  So on my dime I took a model and my crew out to Oceanside to do a shoot testing out the Fotodiox Fusion Adapter.  I want to state again as I did in my original video, the idea that an adapter could adapt my Nikon glass to my Sony mirrorless bodies is very intriguing for me.  It's something that I root for....and I always hope for the success of others.  Whether it's a fellow photographer or a business I want every honest hard working entity out there to succeed.  I don't take any pleasure in people failing.

So we got out to the shoot and before I attempted to shoot with the camera on any body I called Bohus from Fotodiox (I told him he was on camera and he never asked that I not post the video), and I asked him if there was anything specific I needed to know about the adapter to make sure it worked well on my camera.  He assured me there wasn't anything specific other than to not turn on the camera until the lens and adapter were securely connected.

So I first tried it out on my Sony A6000 with a cheap 18-55 DX lens.  Why?  Well if there was a repeat of my first experience I wanted to try it out on my least expensive camera body and lens. Once it seemed to maintain power on the A6000 (it wouldn't focus well at all but I expected that), I decided it was time to try it out on my A7Rii.

So I got my A7Rii, (my favorite camera) and started trying out my Nikon lenses.  First I put the cheap 18-55 lens on it to also make sure it wasn't going to short out etc.  Once it seemed to maintain power etc. I moved on to actually being able to test the adapter for the first time.

The first lens to try out was the 105mm macro lens that I used to use a lot for portraiture work.  It did acquire focus and it did not short circuit my camera.  YAY!  Success!  It did however seem to shift the entire inner workings of the lens though in a very odd manner.  It's almost as if the lens was too heavy for the adapter from a load standpoint.  I'm no engineer at all....but it was weird.

You can check that out by watching the video.  I show the back of the camera so the viewer can see what I saw and experienced.  I then did a shoot with the 105mm macro lens and you can see some of the pics below:

I then decided to try it on my Nikon mount Tokina 16-28 f/2.8 lens.  When I first put it on the camera just shut off.  It wouldn't turn on.  This was very concerning to me but I remembered the directions on the website that said (I'm paraphrasing) to just turn the camera off, take the battery out for 10 seconds and then try it again.  So I did that...and it worked!  The camera turned back on.  Why test it with a Tokina lens?  Simple really.  Many people out there would be very curious to know if it also worked with Nikon mount lenses that weren't Nikon made lenses.

So with the camera turned on and the lens ready to go I started testing it.  The lens seemed to acquire focus pretty well, the only issue was that it would only work between 20mm to 28mm. For some crazy reason it would NOT focus at 16mm.  This is also illustrated in the video.  Below are images taken using the 16-28mm lens:

After I finished shooting with both lenses I took out my D800 and tested these same lenses on the Nikon body to see if they exhibited any of the strange behaviors as they did with the Fotodiox Fusion Adapter.  They didn't.  They worked perfectly.  The 105mm macro didn't make any weird noises that sounded like it was dropping, and the Tokina lens focused well at 16mm.

I tried many other lenses on the adapter as well but they wouldn't work...but in all fairness they weren't supposed to work.  These were non AF-I and AF-S lenses.  When I put them on the body the adapter didn't even try to focus.  It automatically went to manual focus.  I could tell it immediately went to Manual Focus because I could see the Focus Peaking on the back of my camera.

All in all, I think it's a toss up.  Does the adapter work as well as Metabones or Sigma does with Canon lenses?  No, it doesn't.  Does it work well enough to give it a try if you're trying to use your Nikon lenses on Sony bodies?  Perhaps.  But the worries of it shorting out a camera are real. Fotodiox must be willing to stand behind their product if and when others have issues.  I'm incredibly fortunate that I have many camera bodies to be able to use.  Many photographers simply do not have that option.  So if they lost a camera body it would be devastating.

Now for those non Sony shooters out there who aren't familiar with the adapting lenses game and think that us Sony shooters are crazy for even attempting such things, let me know shed some light on using adapters.  

"In the 2.5 years that I've been a Sony shooter I've never had another adapter once give me any problems."  

I've never had to turn off my camera, remove a battery, etc.  They have simply worked. Earlier iterations of the Metabones adapters didn't work well as it related to how they acquired focus, but none of them posed a potential risk to my camera.  This isn't a Sony issue, it's a Fotodiox adapter combined with a Sony body and Nikon lens issue.

I truly hope for Fotodiox's sake and for the sake of photographers out there that my first adapter was a fluke and a defect.  But only time will tell.  If other photographers start reporting problems out there it could be a real issue for Fotodiox.  The fact that it caused my 105mm macro to behave in a weird manner, and that it wouldn't focus throughout the entire focal range of my Tokina lens was simply strange.

If you take away the potential danger of losing a camera body because the adapter shorts it out...the actual performance of the adapter is pretty good....IF you use it with the right lenses.  It will hunt and will only work well near the center of the frame.  It doesn't track very well and it doesn't find focus in the edges at all.  It also doesn't work well with Flexible Spot.  It doesn't approach the performance level of using Canon lenses on Sony bodies with the Metabones or Sigma adapter.  So if you're like me and are used to that you will be somewhat let down.

And as stated in the video.  Do NOT try and adapt lenses for auto focus functionality with anything except the A6500, A6300 or A7Rii.  If you do you will be disappointed.  Let's please make sure people out there understand this...:)

All in all, it was a blast to use my old Nikon lenses again and I'm hoping that companies continue to improve on the technology of adapters so that we can someday enjoy our Nikon lenses on Sony bodies like we are currently able to do with Canon lenses on Sony bodies.  

I'm a HUGE advocate of using native and adapted glass on Sony bodies because the opportunities are endless and truly presents an advantage for Sony users over other shooters.  I'll be cheering for Fotodiox and others to continue to push hard to make it work better for us as photographers and when it does, I'll be the first to let you all know...:)

Thanks,

Jason

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Using Manual Focus for Fast Action Shots to get Amazing Results using the Sony A7Rii and Canon 200mm f/1.8

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Using Manual Focus for Fast Action Shots to get Amazing Results using the Sony A7Rii and Canon 200mm f/1.8

San Francisco- so my team and I drove up from So Cal up to the Bay area to do some shooting. We found ourselves at the ruins of the Sutro Baths where the waves crash into the rocks and ruins with some pretty dramatic results.

I had my Sony A7Rii and Canon 200mm f/1.8 lens with me and wanted to see just what we could capture with our model Kyli and the waves coming in.  While I'm used to great auto focus from this combo of camera and lens, I'm also aware of the fact that shooting a solitary object like a model can be difficult to get consistent sharp focus on when things like waves and mist fly in front of her as it did in the shooting scenario we did here.

So using Focus Peaking (which I love by the way), I focused in on the model to get tack sharp focus.  Since my camera and lens were on a tripod, and the model was in a set position, I was able to set the focus and make sure it was on her so no matter what flew in front of her, the focus wouldn't change.

Well the waves didn't disappoint.  They rolled on in crashing on the rocks beneath her giving off some amazing spray as well as background.  One particular set was so strong the splash of the wave completely filled the frame behind the model giving it a truly beautiful effect.

So if this kind of work is of interest to you, you might just want to try this technique so you can create some really cool shots of your own.  I hope it helps!  Below are the pics from the shoot.  I truly hope it helps.  Don't forget to subscribe to my blog by clicking below!

Thanks,

Jason

Shots taken at 1/6400 sec, f/1.8, ISO 50 at 200mm

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Gear I Use #10- the Lastolite Tri Flip 8 in 1 Reflector

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Gear I Use #10- the Lastolite Tri Flip 8 in 1 Reflector

So if you're new to the reflector game....it's time to jump in y'all.  While I'm known as a big time advocate of LED lighting and off camera flash using monolights....we must NEVER forget how important reflectors are in a true photographer's work.  

I must admit that it's something I didn't hear about a lot when I came up in the world of photography.  Everyone was either obsessed with led lights, strobes, or natural light.  Reflectors didn't seem to get a lot of love.

So as my career progressed and I learned more and more about how photography can and should be approached, my love for reflectors and diffusers grew.  I used HUGE, big, medium and small. And truthfully all of them have their purpose and place.

Today I'm talking about the 8 in 1 Lastolite Tri Flip that I like to use for quick use primarily in areas where I don't have a lot of space or don't have a lot of time to set up bigger reflectors.  Here are the reasons I really like using this reflector kit:

  • Price- it's relatively cheap.  About $100 for the entire set of 8
  • Quality- it's well built and holds up better in wind than a traditional round flimsy reflector
  • Handle- I REALLY like that it has a handle which makes it easy for either the model or the photographer or assistant to hold.
  • Small- it folds up very small and is easy to transport.  Easily fits into a carry on suitcase for a flight

Below are some images taken with the different fabrics.  Please take a look at the video to get a better idea as to how they all looked and the light they produced.

I hope this helps.  Please take a look at the pics below and if you feel like it'll work for you there's a link below to order.

Links to Gear:

**Links to Gear:

*Lastolite Tri Flip 8 in 1-  

*Sony A7Rii-  

*Canon 85mm f/1.2 lens-  

Thanks!

Jason

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What Pro Photographers Images Look Like Raw, Unedited or with Lightroom Edits Only

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What Pro Photographers Images Look Like Raw, Unedited or with Lightroom Edits Only

So I get asked a lot about my images and work.  People wanna know how much of it is editing vs. what I capture in camera.  While I'm not opposed to photographers editing their images, I do take great pride in what I'm able to capture and create in camera vs. relying on post processing wizardry.  There's something so old school about creating it in camera.  I personally feel it's more gratifying and is also a greater challenge.

Maybe I get this attitude due to the fact that my roots are based in being a landscape photographer.  That's why I've always incorporated so much of nature into my work.  So from time to time I'll create posts and videos where I not only show my finished work, but also my completely unedited raw and straight out of the camera work as well.  Now for those wondering I won't be posting my raw files onto these posts.  Why?  Because I don't want other people taking my work and editing it for their use or pleasure.

Sometimes folks post raw shots for others to see.  But those are for the viewer to get a look at how a lens or camera performs for example.  Or the shot is posted so people can download it and try a certain photoshop technique.  This isn't that kind of a post.  This post is about showing how much I capture in camera vs. what I create afterwards and I hope it helps to shed some light on what I do.

To start off I pretty much use Lightroom for ALL of my work.  This is largely in part to time.  I'm not opposed to Photoshop in any way and kudos to those who choose to use it for their work.   But with a full time photography company and full time Youtube Channel, I just need the streamlined workflow of Lightroom to get my work done quickly.  The only times I would use Photoshop would perhaps be for images being submitted to a competition etc.  The work you see on Youtube and on my website is all Lightroom only.

So I did this shoot with a beautiful model named Jazmen Parker in Oceanside, California.  I used the Sony A7Rii with the Rokinon 14mm f/2.8 lens.  I used the Flashpoint Xplor600 in High Speed Sync for off camera flash.

To be able to illustrate how my shots look in Raw I did screen captures of select images from the shoot while open in Lightroom.  These shots are seen in the gallery below:

I then exported these same shots as shown in the screen captures as completely unedited (SOOC) jpegs.  This gallery is below:

And here are my shots that were edited using Lightroom only

I truly hope this post helps to shed a little light on what images look like out of the camera for a professional photographer.  Links to gear are included below:

**Links to Gear:

*Sony A7Rii-  

*Rokinon 14mm f/2.8-  

*Flashpoint Xplor 600-  

*Westcott Rapid Box XL-  

Jason

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Sony A6500 4K Overheating Test in a REAL World Shooting Environment

So, I released a video about the A6500 not overheating when shooting in 1080p.  It lasted for well over 2 hours with no problems.  So the next question was, "Well, how does it perform in 4K?" This question was raised by many folks online interested to see how well it could do when being put under a bigger strain of recording 4K vs. 1080p.

Luckily we anticipated people would be interested to know if it would work so immediately following the 1080p test, we rolled the 4K test.  Keep in mind at the point we started doing the 4K test the camera had already been rolling for over 2 hours non-stop in 1080p.  The only breaks it got were literally for changing out batteries and of course turning the recording back on when it would stop at 29:50.  Those breaks for battery swaps or hitting the record button again were all of 5-10 seconds each at the most.

 

The camera had also been sitting out in the sun, on a tripod for hours.  It wasn't a hot day outside, not a cold day, just a normal day in Southern California.  I like to test a camera's performance in the real world shooting conditions that I encounter on a daily basis.

So we hit the record button on the A6500 recording at 24fps, 100 mbps in 4K in Super 35mm mode.  If you've watched the 1080p version of this test you'll already know that this camera was a 2 day loaner from Sony.  We had a very limited time to conduct tests and do shoots so we tried to maximize every minute we had.  This test was at the end of my time using the camera and it needed to be returned to Sony HQ in San Diego.

So we packed up from our shooting location in La Jolla and took off to Sony HQ to return the camera.  I set the camera on a tripod for virtually the entire time.  It stayed on a tripod in my truck on the drive over.  Once I arrived at Sony I did a battery swap and then went inside the return the camera.

It never overheated.

The camera did get warm at one point and it was due to the battery getting warm but the camera didn't stop recording.  This was when the battery was close to dying.  Once it was swapped out the camera went from warm to barely warm continued to record with no problem.

I kept the camera rolling as long as I could get away with it.  In fact I ended up completely filling up my memory card...and I also needed to return it to Sony...lol.  I was waiting in the lobby to return it and kept recording until they needed it back to ship off to Fedex.

Total recording time was 1 hour, 7 minutes and 53 seconds.  It just never overheated.  A couple of notes in regards to testing gear:

  • Anything Can Fail- If you try hard enough you can make any product out there fail.  I recommend trying it the actual conditions that you plan on using the gear.  Because placing a square metal object (camera) down in very hot sand or on a hot rock is of course going to overheat a unit.  If you leave virtually any electronic item in the sun on a hot surface for long enough it will indeed overheat (phones are a great example of this).  
  • How Long Do you REALLY need to record?  While these tests are fun to do you have to ask yourself, "How long do I actually need to record something?"  Do you truly intend on recording for hours on end with the A6500?  Whenever I'm recording one of my presentations and I'm going for a LONG time, I simply plug in a video camera.  These cameras aren't intended to replace the role of a video camera.  They are intended to be stills cameras that enable many of us to also use them for video functionality.  I do intend on using the A6500 for a lot of my video work since it has IBIS, 4K video etc.  But I can honestly say I don't see myself recording consecutive 29:50 clips for endless amounts of time....and I'd dare say the vast majority of people out there won't either. 
  • Having Fun- part of the joy of me doing Youtube is my ability to share so many cool ideas and products with the photography community out there.  With all of the product reviews and videos that I do I always try and keep them lighthearted and fun.  Because if you aren't having fun doing them...why do them?  Life's too short to be miserable...:)

More than anything I just hope the content helps people out there.  Whether or not you think it will work for you is honestly only a decision you can make.  But I'm very happy that the A6500 is performing better than it's predecessors especially as it related to 4K.  If anything it should run hotter since it has the IBIS inside of it, whereas the A6000 and A6300 do not.  Maybe Sony just turned off the limiter and decided to let you go crazy with this camera.  Who knows?

I'm just thrilled that it's performing the way that it is and I hope it helped!  And as I always say, just find the right gear that works for you....regardless of the brand name on the front all that matters is what works best in your hands.

Thanks,

Jason

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My Sony A6500 will NOT Overheat...no matter how hard I tried to get it to!

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My Sony A6500 will NOT Overheat...no matter how hard I tried to get it to!

Well, I tried.  I really gave it an honest try.  With all the hubbub over the A6000 series cameras overheating, one of the first things I wanted to try out when I got my hands on the A6500 was how well the new camera responded to overheating.

With earlier cameras like the A6000 and A6300 there were issues for some when shooting video and the camera overheating.  Now let's set the record straight on something that should be common knowledge but isn't.  Unless a camera is classified as a "video camera" like the Panasonic GH4 is....it will NOT exceed the 30 minute time frame.  Companies do this quite simply to save money.  Video cameras are taxed at a higher rate than still cameras...it's a fact.

So when any still camera stops recording at the 29:50 mark, it isn't overheating, it's simply obeying the law based upon if it's a video camera or a still camera.  The REAL question that needs to be answered is, "Once it stops, can you immediately hit the RECORD button and start recording again?"

When I first got the A6000 nearly 3 years ago and took it with me to Ethiopia, the video would overheat after about 20 minutes or so and the camera wouldn't turn back on until it cooled off.  The A6300 was better, but it did indeed overheat at about the 25 minute mark when recording 4k video.

So when Sony added IBIS (In Body Image Stabilization) to the A6500, conventional wisdom would indicate that there would actually be MORE heat going on inside the camera body, not less. So I was ready to be disappointed with how well the camera handled heat.

BOY, was I surprised.  I got a loaner camera for Sony and was able to shoot with it for two days.  I was so busy trying to crank out shots and test it as much as I could that I really didn't get a chance to just leave it recording for an endless amount of time.  On top of that, I couldn't just leave it recording through the middle of the night because it will stop at 29:50 no matter what. Meaning I'd have to be awake and hit the record button every 30 minutes.  Plus, I wanted the footage to be REAL.  I wanted to test it in conditions that I would actually use the camera in.

I see so many tests online that simply are ridiculous.  Tests where people set a camera in hot sand or on a hot rock that's roasting in the sun and then are shocked that a completely metal object like a camera would get hot.  That's honestly laughable.

Like all of my reviews and tests, I care about how it will perform in the real world, not sitting on a rock in the desert.  Because after all, who in the world is gonna use it like that?  Nobody...unlesss you're a desert hermit without a tripod who vlogs I guess.

So I started recording on this camera.  Predictably it stopped recording at the 29:50 mark.  But to my happy surprise when I immediately hit the record button again, it started recording immediately.  But then....it kept recording.  And wouldn't overheat.

I could NOT get the A6500 to OVERHEAT!!!  I shot it in 1080p (yes I tested in 4k as well but that's for another post), and it would NOT overheat.  You guys seriously have to watch the video to see what I'm talking about.

It got to the point where I had models and my photography crew standing around waiting for the darn thing to overheat so we could start shooting with it.  It got so bad that I was WANTING it to overheat lol.

IT NEVER OVERHEATED.  Barely got warm.

At the 2 hour and 2 minute mark I said enough was enough.  My memory card was full and I'd gone through 2 batteries.  It simply would not overheat.  I had one of the models come over to the camera (that was in direct sunlight for hours by the way) and her words were that the camera was "barely warm".

So how did Sony do it?  Well, they removed the constraints that were placed on the camera.  You can go into the menu and turn off the limiter that prevents the camera from shutting down when it overheats.  But that being said, it was never even physically hot.  It felt like a camera normally feels when you've held it in your hands for a good 10 minutes....just a mild warmth.

I can't completely explain how Sony did as I'm not one of their engineers and I simply don't know. And to that end I really don't care how they did it.  I just care that they did.  I hope to see the same advancements in future iterations of their other cameras.

Stay tuned for the 4k test as well!!!

**Links to Gear:

*Sony A6500-  

*Sony 35mm Zeiss-  

*Feisol Tripod- 

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Using the Sony A6500 with Canon Lenses- is this the best Sony Mirrorless for Adapted Lenses?

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Using the Sony A6500 with Canon Lenses- is this the best Sony Mirrorless for Adapted Lenses?

So after I had a little bit of time to test the A6500 with native Sony lenses and quickly determined that it was the fastest Sony Mirrorless I've used for auto focus (yes, both full frame and crop sensor) I decided to try it with a Canon lens and the Sigma MC-11 Adapter.

Now recently I've released review videos using the A7Rii with the Metabones Mark 4 and Sigma MC-11 adapters with Canon mount lenses.  To date the A7Rii and the A6300 have been the best camera bodies for using these lenses....well, not any more.

The A6500 is a special camera for auto focus guys and gals.  I'm telling you.  IT IS.  I noticed it the second I picked it up and started shooting with it.  But my review and video for the native lenses will come a little later.  This is about Canon adapted lenses.

Previously as shown in the review videos the coverage on adapted lenses extends to just about the middle 60% of the sensor.  I was sincerely shocked to find that the Sigma MC-11 Adapter with the Canon 50mm f/1.2 lens covered the ENTIRE sensor.  Top to bottom, left to right.  THE WHOLE DAMN THING.

SHOCKED.  It honestly shoots like native glass and I'm not kidding.  Don't believe me?  Watch the video where I reel off 115 consecutive images in Hi+ continuous mode shooting WIDE OPEN at f/1.2 and every shot is in focus.  It is RIDICULOUS!!!!

More tests to come, so make sure to check back for more videos and reviews!!

The images below were taken with the A6500 using the Canon 50mm with the Sigma MC-11 Adapter.  All were taken in cameras as jpegs as currently (as of the time of writing this review) there is no profile available to import Raw files on the A6500.

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Sony A6500 REAL World Hands on Touch Screen Test for Stills and Video using the Sony 85mm G Master

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Sony A6500 REAL World Hands on Touch Screen Test for Stills and Video using the Sony 85mm G Master

So I got to test the Sony A6500 for the first time today.  One of the newest and most talked about feature on the A6500 is the touch screen.  It's the first time a touch screen has been put on one of the semi-pro (A6000, A6300) or pro level (A7 series) camera lines.

 

Many people have been asking for this feature to be added to the Sony mirrorless line for a very long time.  While some cameras in the Sony NEX series had some touch screen capabilities on them, none of the recent Sony mirrorless cameras over the last 2.5 years have included the feature.  I for one did not see a huge NEED for touch screen and was perfectly happy with my cameras not having the feature.  But clearly many people wanted it, and Sony listened.

So when I got my hands on the camera this was one of the very first things I tested.  I went down to La Jolla Cove near San Diego with my crew and a beautiful model named Kelsey Barker.  I set the camera up on my Feisol tripod and tested it both in stills and movie mode.

It was pretty impressive.  The stills mode was very nice and I could see using it for portraits work where instantaneous focus isn't required.  In my opinion this will be for making sure you get the focus EXACTLY where you want it, and I'll also note this is a faster option than going through the menu to select a Flexible spot point.

Where the touch screen truly shined was in video (movie) mode.  As someone who uses my A7 and A6000 series camera for filming my Youtube Channel this is going to be a big deal for us.  The focus was very smooth as it transitioned between areas of focus that were pointed out on the screen.  All of this is illustrated in the video included in this blog post, so please make sure to watch it.

When the A6500 was announced many people asked if it was worth the upgrade over the A6300 which is only 9 months old.  I'm on record as saying this camera excited me more than anything for what it would do on the video end of things....and so far with the touch screen, my excitement is real for this camera and it's possibilities.  I now truly hope the future iterations of Sony mirrorless cameras will have the touch screen option on them.

While professional videographers may argue over whether or not they would use auto focus in their work, for a lot of folks like me who are more hybrid photographers/videographers, having that touch screen and being able to get a beautifully transitioned rack focus is pretty special.

I can't wait to play with it more...:)

**Links to Gear:

*Sony A6500-  

*Sony 85mm G Master- 

*Feisol Tripod- 

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Commercial Photography Photo Shoot and Workshop for Mia Bella Couture by Jason Lanier

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Commercial Photography Photo Shoot and Workshop for Mia Bella Couture by Jason Lanier

Recently I had the opportunity to do a commercial photo shoot for a beautiful gown company called Mia Bella Couture.  When they first contacted me to do the shoot they knew that I sometimes allowed some of my followers to attend my shoots as part of a workshop and asked if I'd be interested in doing so with them.  I thought it would work out well so we booked the shoot.

When we got to the shoot down in San Diego it was truly awesome.  This is a shoot that you truly have to watch the video to see how we handled it.  We started off the day at 11am and my clients wanted to shoot in a specific location that was beautiful, but given the time of the day it was not ideal for lighting.  So we had to bring out a ton of diffusers and reflectors to make the lighting work.

This shoot was done using the Flasphpoint Xplor600 with a bunch of different gear that is showcased in the video.  This is just Part 1 of the shoot as we crammed so much into one day that I needed to break up the videos to show it all.

A big thank you to the beautiful models Lauren Lebouef and Tiffany Brock as well as Daryl Rene for the amazing work with Hair and Make Up.

I hope you all enjoy the video and I can't wait to share the other parts of the shoot with you as well.  Beautiful gowns, gorgeous models, and my team all came together to make it a tremendous shoot.  

**Links to Gear:

*Sony A7Rii- 

*Canon 200mm f/2.8- 

*Metabones Mark 4 Adapter- 

*Flashpoint Xplor600- 

*Westcott Rapid Box XL- 

*Westcott 8x8 Scrim Jim- 

Below are some images from the shoot taken with my Sony A7Rii and the Canon 200mm f/2.8 lens using the Metabones Mark 4 Adapter.  Stay tuned for Part 2!!!

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Using the Sigma MC-11 Adapter on Sony Mirrorless Cameras with Canon and Sigma Lenses

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Using the Sigma MC-11 Adapter on Sony Mirrorless Cameras with Canon and Sigma Lenses

So as many of you know I really like shooting with both native and adapted lenses on my Sony mirrorless bodies.  When it comes to shooting with Canon lenses I've been using the Metabones Mark 4 Adapter with some pretty awesome results in regards to Auto Focus.  There are a ton of adapters that work just fine for manual use, but when it comes to auto focus and transferring exif data you have to be more careful. 

There are other adapters out there like Fotodiox, Vello, etc. but all of them really lag behind the performance of the Metabones as it relates to acquiring focus, reliability, build quality and more. And the Metabones is definitely more expensive, so it makes sense that we should expect more.

Well earlier this year Sigma announced their brand new adapter, the Sigma MC-11.  I first tried it in March when it was very new while at the WPPI convention.  Since I already had the Metabones I saw no real need to pick up the Sigma.  It worked well, but there was no marked improvement over the Metabones especially when using Canon lenses.  I didn't own any Sigma lenses so I didn't purchase it.

Fast forward to last month where I attended PhotoPlus in New York City.  My followers had asked me quite a bit about using this adapter and also wanted to know about the Sigma Art lenses.  I became quite interested in the Sigma 20mm f/1.4 lens and once that happened, I wanted to try it on the Sigma MC-11.

So I purchased the adapter and the Sigma 20mm and gave it a go.  The first thing I noticed was that the Sigma performed just about as well as the Metabones did with the Canon lenses that I owned.  In fact, the very first shoot I ever did with the Sigma MC-11 was on the Canon 85mm f/1.2 lens.

I then had the opportunity to use the MC-11 with the 20mm on my commercial shoot for Mia Bella Couture.  It was pretty awesome.  I have to say that the Sigma MC-11 Adapter with the Sigma lenses is about the closest thing to using Sony native lenses.  In fact there are virtually all the options using Sigma lenses with the MC-11 Adapter that we enjoy on Sony native lenses including; Eye Auto Focus, All the Focus Modes and Focus Areas etc.  Many of these options are missing when you use the Metabones adapter, or when you use the Sigma Adapter with Canon (non-Sigma) lenses.

**Links to Gear:

*Sigma MC-11 Adapter- 

*Metabones Mark 4 Adapter- 

*Sony A7Rii- 

*Feisol Monopod- 

So in short if you want the closest experience to native lenses you choose the Sigma MC-11 Adapter with Sigma lenses...and I especially love the Art lenses.  Make sure to check out Sigma lens compatibility chart as well before purchasing a lens.  The Sigma MC-11 will work with both Sigma lenses and Canon mount Sigma lenses on your Sony body.

If you are coming over to Sony as a Canon shooter and want to use your lenses on a Sony body I'd give the slight edge to Metabones as it relates to Autofocus...but not by much.  There's also a good edge to the Sigma adapter as it is $150 less than the Metabones which is significant.

I plan on doing a full on shoot and comparison between the Metabones Mark 4 Adapter and the Sigma MC-11 Adapter in the near future.  To see my current review of the Metabones Mark 4 Adapter please click HERE.

Below are shots taken with both Canon EF lenses and Canon mount Sigma lenses on the MC-11 Adapter.  I hope it helps!

Thanks,

Jason

Images taken with the Sigma MC-11 using the Canon mount Sigma 20mm f/1.4 Art Lens

Images taken using the Sigma MC-11 Adapter with both Canon and Sigma lenses.  Please refer to the video to view the images.

Images taken using the Sigma MC-11 Adapter with the Canon 85mm f/1.2 lens.

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